You asked: Can Vietnamese mint be dried?

To dry the mint, tie a few stalks with string and leave hanging upside down in a well-ventilated place. As it dries, you need to avoid it becoming moist or damp as harmful mould can form. Either store as dried branches, much as you would bayleaves, or take the leaves off and keep in an airtight container in the pantry.

Can mint be frozen or dried?

Mint (Mentha spp.) can be saved for later use by drying or freezing, though it is best to use the dried leaves within a year and the frozen leaves within 6 months for the best flavor. Begin by rinsing and gently patting your herbs dry. Drying is done by hanging bundles of 4 – 6 stems each, in an airy, dry, dark place.

How long does dried mint last?

Store the dried mint in a cool, dark area for up to 12 months for optional freshness. After that, it will begin to deteriorate in quality. Top Tip: in the immediate days after drying the mint, check on the leaves for any sign of moisture in the container.

Vietnamese coriander is not related to the mints, nor is it in the mint family Lamiaceae, but its general appearance and fragrance are reminiscent of them.

Persicaria odorata.

Vietnamese coriander
Family: Polygonaceae
Genus: Persicaria
Species: P. odorata
Binomial name
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How do you preserve Vietnamese mint?

Place the Vietnamese mint, stems down, in a small container of water and place a plastic bag over the leaves. It can be refrigerated for up to a week. Be sure to change the water every couple of days. To dry hang small bunches upside down in a cool dark place for about two weeks then store in an airtight container.

How do you keep mint from going bad?

If you want to store fresh mint and other herbs in the fridge, store them in a glass jar and treat them like a bouquet of flowers. Or, store only the mint leaves between sheets of damp paper towel, and they will keep for two to three weeks.

Can you freeze Vietnamese mint?

You could also freeze the leaves for a rainy day or dry them out. For the former, remove the leaves from the stem and lay on baking trays in the freezer. Once frozen, pack loosely into freezer bags making sure you don’t crush them too much but do expel as much air as you can.

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