Question: What do Vietnamese celebrate?

The most important holiday celebrated in Vietnam, and indeed by Vietnamese people worldwide, is Tet, the Vietnamese New Year. Tet is commonly described as Christmas, Thanksgiving and your birthday all celebrated at once. The second most celebrated Vietnamese holiday is the Mid-Autumn Festival.

What traditions are unique to celebrations in Vietnam?

7 of the best festivals in Vietnam

  1. Tet (New Year) Let’s start at the top. …
  2. Hue Arts Festival. If you consider yourself somewhat of a culture vulture, Hue Arts Festival is a must. …
  3. Hoi An Lantern Festival. …
  4. Wandering Souls Day/Ghost Festival (Trung Nguyen) …
  5. Dalat Flower Festival. …
  6. Perfume Pagoda Festival.

What do Vietnamese celebrate instead of Christmas?

In Vietnam, Christmas Eve is often more important than Christmas Day. … People celebrate by throwing confetti, taking pictures and enjoying the Christmas decorations and lights of big hotels and department stores. Lots of cafes and restaurants are open for people to enjoy a snack!

What is the most important Vietnamese celebration?

The most important holiday celebrated in Vietnam, and indeed by Vietnamese people worldwide, is Tet, the Vietnamese New Year. Tet is commonly described as Christmas, Thanksgiving and your birthday all celebrated at once. The second most celebrated Vietnamese holiday is the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Do Vietnamese celebrate Christmas?

The vast majority of Vietnam is Buddhist – but that doesn’t stop them from celebrating Christmas. The Vietnamese are fun-loving people and welcome all kinds of festivals as a way to get together and party. For most Vietnamese, Christmas is more of a novelty than a religious event and it isn’t an official holiday.

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Do the Vietnamese celebrate birthdays?

Celebrating individual birthdays is rare in Vietnam, where they are instead celebrated on the Vietnamese holiday of Tet, a New Year’s celebration. A similar tradition happens in Korea. In parts of Asia, children are given red envelopes with money inside for their birthdays and New Year’s celebrations.

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