What rights do Thailand have?

The 2007 constitution reinstated much of the extensive catalogue of rights explicitly recognized in the People’s Constitution of 1997. That constitution outlined the right to freedom of speech, freedom of press, peaceful assembly, association, religion, and movement within the country and abroad.

Does Thailand have freedom of speech?

Freedom of speech was guaranteed in the 1997 Constitution of Thailand. Those guarantees continue in the 2007 Constitution, which states in part: Section 36: A person shall enjoy the liberty of communication by any means [บุคคลย่อมมีเสรีภาพในการติดต่อสื่อสารถึงกันไม่ว่าในทางใดๆ].

What type of government does Thailand have 2021?

The monarchy

The constitution stipulates that although the sovereignty of the state is vested in the people, the king will exercise such powers through the three branches of the Thai government.

What are illegal in Thailand?

Vaporisers (like e-cigarettes and e-baraku) and refills are illegal in Thailand. These items may be confiscated and you could be fined or sent to prison for up to 10 years if convicted. Their sale or supply is also banned and you could face a heavy fine or up to 5 years imprisonment if found guilty.

What are the human rights issues in Thailand?

Significant human rights issues included: reports of unlawful or arbitrary killings by the government or its agents; torture and cases of cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment by government officials; arbitrary arrest and detention by government authorities; political prisoners; politically motivated …

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Is VPN illegal in Thailand?

Is it legal to use a VPN in Thailand? Yes. Unlike a handful of other countries across Asia, most notably China, there are no laws against using a VPN in Thailand. Doing so is therefore perfectly legal, without the need to fear any kind of prosecution.

What are the five main human rights problems in Thailand?

Significant human rights issues included: unlawful or arbitrary killings by the government or its agents; forced disappearance by or on behalf of the government; torture by government officials; arbitrary arrest and detention by government authorities; political prisoners; political interference in the judiciary; …

What should I avoid in Thailand?

1. Places for backpackers to stay

  • Avoid: Khao San Road. …
  • Instead: Sukhumvit and Siam Square are popular and convenient alternatives. …
  • Avoid: Bargaining a flat rate with a taxi driver. …
  • Instead: Insist on using the meter – it’s illegal for taxi drivers to refuse. …
  • Avoid: Ping Pong Shows.

Is chewing gum illegal in Thailand?

3) It’s a punishable offence to throw (used) chewing gum on the pavement. I wouldn’t really class this one as silly – unusual, perhaps, but not an out-and-out silly one of the laws in Thailand. Plus, it’s one that’s definitely worth bearing in mind because there’s a pretty hefty fine if you get caught (nearly £400).

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