Question: What year did the Manila Acapulco galleon trade happen?

The Manila Galleon Trade (1565–1815)

When did the galleon trade start?

The Spanish inaugurated the Manila galleon trade route in 1565 after the Augustinian friar and navigator Andrés de Urdaneta pioneered the tornaviaje or return route from the Philippines to Mexico. Urdaneta and Alonso de Arellano made the first successful round trips that year.

Why is it called galleon trade?

The Galleon Trade

The Spanish government continued trade relations with these countries, and the Manila became the center of commerce in the East. The Spaniards closed the ports of Manila to all countries except Mexico. Thus, the Manila–Acapulco Trade, better known as the “Galleon Trade” was born.

Who stopped galleon trade?

On September 14, 1815, the galleon trade between the Philippines and Mexico ended a few years before Mexico gained independence from Spain in 1821. The Spanish Crown took direct control of the country, and was governed directly from Madrid.

How did the galleon trade affect globalization?

“Globalization started with trade in Asia, in Spanish America,” said Mr. Gordon. He further emphasized that the galleon trade put up the ground for globalization by bringing about economic and cultural exchange and integration of financial markets between Asia and the Americas.

Why is galleon trade important?

The Manila galleon trade made significant contributions to colonial Spanish culture. It helped to fashion the very society of the Philippines, which relied upon its income, its merchandise, and the services of Chinese, Malay, and other participants.

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When was Situado Real delivered from the Mexican Treasury to the Philippines stopped?

SITUADO real delivered from the Mexican treasury of the Philippines through the galleons. This subsidy stopped as Mexico became Independence 1820.

What is the Manila Acapulco trade?

The so-called Manila Galleon (“Nao de China” or “Nao de Acapulco”) brought porcelain, silk, ivory, spices, and myriad other exotic goods from China to Mexico in exchange for New World silver. (It is estimated that as much as one-third of the silver mined in New Spain and Peru went to the Far East.)

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