Is Vietnamese mint the same as normal mint?

Vietnamese Mint is also known as Vietnamese Coriander or Hot Mint but is actually not related to the Mint family at all! Its name is due to its general appearance and fragrance, which are reminiscent of mint. In Southeast Asian cooking, Vietnamese mint is often used interchangeably with mint and coriander.

What can I use instead of Vietnamese mint?

Vietnamese coriander, or Vietnamese cilantro, is a heat-loving perennial with slightly spicy, flavorful leaves that are a great culinary substitute for cilantro or mint.

What can I do with extra Vietnamese mint?

You could also freeze the leaves for a rainy day or dry them out. For the former, remove the leaves from the stem and lay on baking trays in the freezer. Once frozen, pack loosely into freezer bags making sure you don’t crush them too much but do expel as much air as you can.

How do you store Vietnamese mint?

Place the Vietnamese mint, stems down, in a small container of water and place a plastic bag over the leaves. It can be refrigerated for up to a week. Be sure to change the water every couple of days. To dry hang small bunches upside down in a cool dark place for about two weeks then store in an airtight container.

Can you eat Vietnamese mint stems?

The bitter herb is a bit smaller, its leaves have smoother edges, and the stem is smooth. Because of its strong taste, it’s not recommendable to eat this herb raw but you can use it in a lot of soups. It’s also served alongside a traditional Vietnamese hot pot for people who want to add some bitterness in their broth.

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What kind of mint is used for pho?

Depending on your pho philosophy, you can go super-simple or ornate with the tabletop pho garnishes. I keep things easy with regular spearmint (húng) from my garden and chiles that I’ve purchased or grown at home.

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